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Allowing Hemp growth will help farmers subsidize crops.

These black apples are worth $7 each but farmers don’t want to grow them for this reason

We’ve all heard the notion that “an apple a day keeps the doctor away,” and it’s fair to say that the apple is one of the most popular fruits out there. After all, they are easy to eat, you can grab one on the go, and they are pretty darn delicious! But how many different types of apples have you seen before? When you make your way to the grocery store or the farmer’s market, you’ve probably only seen the likes of red and green apples. However, it seems as though there are even more varieties, colors, shapes, and sizes. Yes, there are more apples in the world than we can count, and these $7 black apples have recently taken the world by the storm. The only problem is that most farmers are refusing to grow them, and for a good reason…

An apple a day

When was the last time you ate an apple? You probably don’t need to think back too far, because apples are a staple fruit in our society. You can find them in every grocery store, you can pick them straight off the tree, and you can even mix them into pies, cakes, pastries, and more.

The world may be our oyster, but the world is also our apple – and we certainly take advantage of this. However, there’s a high chance that you’ve only really experienced the taste of red or green apples. These are the most common apples in existence, and they can normally be found anywhere in the world. But what if someone offered you the chance to eat a $7 black apple?

To continue reading follow link.

http://www.universityfox.com/stories/these-black-apples-are-worth-7-each-but-farmers-dont-want-to-grow-them-for-this-reason/?utm_campaign=1PVVE3AllMob+Black+Apples+Worth+V2+NHLine2+MargalitPublishersOnePagersOnly+ShakS+VV+%3D+3+%28Content+Axe%29+En+-+Mobile+USA+FB&utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=WC

Lawmakers Introduce Bipartisan Medical Marijuana Bill.

Lawmakers Introduce Bipartisan Medical Marijuana Bill

January 3, 2019  
Press Release 

 

WASHINGTON – Congressmen Steve Cohen (TN-09) and Don Young (Alaska-at-large) today introduced bipartisan legislation that would allow patients to have access to medical marijuana in states where marijuana is legal without fear of federal prosecution.

The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States (CARERS) Act would amend federal law to allow states to set their own medical marijuana policies and permit doctors with the Department of Veterans Affairs to prescribe medical marijuana to veterans to treat serious and chronic conditions. The legislation would not legalize medical marijuana in all 50 states but would respect the states’ decisions to legalize medical marijuana and would prevent federal law enforcement from prosecuting patients, doctors and caregivers in those states.

Today’s introduction follows bipartisan, bicameral support for similar legislation last Congress: 115th- H.R. 2920, introduced by Reps. Cohen and Young, and 115th – S.  1764, introduced by Senators Cory Booker (D-New Jersey), Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-New York), Mike Lee (R-Utah), Al Franken (D-Minnesota), and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).  

Congressman Cohen made the following statement:

“The national consensus on medical marijuana is solid and bipartisan, but our federal drug laws continue to treat patients and their doctors like criminals. Our bill would bring federal medical marijuana policy in line with the views of the overwhelming majority of Americans by allowing states to set their own marijuana laws, allowing patients, including veterans, to receive the treatments they need from their doctors and improving opportunities for research on marijuana. I am pleased to join with Congressman Young in introducing this important legislation in the House, and I want to thank Senator Booker and the bipartisan Senate coalition for its leadership on this issue.”

Congressman Young made the following statement:

“I’m hopeful that this is going to be a productive Congress regarding the debate over national cannabis policy. Important components such as protecting medical cannabis, access to CBD, expanding research opportunities, and allowing veterans access are provisions in the CARERS Act which I’m proud to cosponsor with Congressman Steve Cohen. This is the kind of bipartisan effort that doesn’t happen every day but should serve as an example of how we can solve the problems that our constituents have sent us here to do. I look forward to promoting this legislation and other measures to protect the rights of states and individuals.”

Senator Booker made the following statement:

“Our federal marijuana laws are broken—they don’t make us safer, they waste taxpayer dollars, and they lack both common sense and compassion,” said Senator Booker. “By ensuring that states are able to set their own medical marijuana policies, the CARERS Act will help ensure access to treatment for those who benefit from medical marijuana – from children suffering from chronic illnesses to veterans battling PTSD.”

View the press release here https://cohen.house.gov/media-center/press-releases/lawmakers-introduce-bipartisan-medical-marijuana-bill?fbclid=IwAR0dSAA4ZAcmbNfjpVK4IRL-D5n_qF797raQin-qtnxOkPibSNm-0pChzpQ

Hemp to Knows…

Hemp can restore unhealthy soil

Thanks to its botanical properties, hemp can actually leave soil better off than when it started by rejuvenating the dirt with nutrients and nitrogen. This helps clean up toxins, heavy metals and other pollutants from the ground through a process called phytoremediation.

Learn more about Hemp on our home page.

HEMP FARMING ACT OF 2018

This is really exciting for the HEMP/CBD community, we are sure many have already heard the news of Hemp being included as part of the FARM BILL 2018. So, of course, we ask ourselves, “so what does it all mean?” To start of it means that HEMP is off of the “Control Substance Act” making it a crop, that farmers can grow without being arrested. Another key amendment is that a State can not prohibit interstate transportation of HEMP. Meaning that the State or Territories can regulate how it is cultivated but they can not restrict the interstate transportation of HEMP. Now to us this one of the biggest piece of information, on two parts. First, States will set their own cultivation regulations as far as licensing and permits and two, if you violate the State regulations farmers “shall not be subject to any criminal or civil enforcement action by the Federal Government or any State government, Tribal government, or local government”.

FULL LEGISLATION TEXT ABOUT HEMP BELOW AND THE FULL FARM BILL DOCUMENT CAN BE DOWNLOADED AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE.

“Subtitle G—Hemp Production
“SEC. 297A. DEFINITIONS.

“In this subtitle:
“(1) HEMP.—The term ‘hemp’ means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.

“(2) INDIAN TRIBE.—The term ‘Indian tribe’ has the meaning given the term in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 5304).

“(3) SECRETARY.—The term ‘Secretary’ means the Secretary of Agriculture.

“(4) STATE.—The term ‘State’ means—

“(A) a State;

“(B) the District of Columbia;

“(C) the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; and

“(D) any other territory or possession of the United States.

“(5) STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.—The term ‘State department of agriculture’ means the agency, commission, or department of a State government responsible for agriculture in the State.

“(6) TRIBAL GOVERNMENT.—The term ‘Tribal government’ means the governing body of an Indian tribe.

“SEC. 297B. STATE AND TRIBAL PLANS.
“(a) Submission.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—A State or Indian tribe desiring to have primary regulatory authority over the production of hemp in the State or territory of the Indian tribe shall submit to the Secretary, through the State department of agriculture (in consultation with the Governor and chief law enforcement officer of the State) or the Tribal government, as applicable, a plan under which the State or Indian tribe monitors and regulates that production as described in paragraph (2).

“(2) CONTENTS.—A State or Tribal plan referred to in paragraph (1)—

“(A) shall only be required to include—

“(i) a practice to maintain relevant information regarding land on which hemp is produced in the State or territory of the Indian tribe, including a legal description of the land, for a period of not less than 3 calendar years;

“(ii) a procedure for testing, using post-decarboxylation or other similarly reliable methods, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration levels of hemp produced in the State or territory of the Indian tribe;

“(iii) a procedure for the effective disposal of products that are produced in violation of this subtitle; and

“(iv) a procedure to comply with the enforcement procedures under subsection (d); and

“(B) may include any other practice or procedure established by a State or Indian tribe, as applicable, to the extent that the practice or procedure is consistent with this subtitle.

“(3) RELATION TO STATE AND TRIBAL LAW.—

“(A) NO PREEMPTION.—Nothing in this subsection preempts or limits any law of a State or Indian tribe regulating the production of hemp, to the extent that law is consistent with this subtitle.

“(B) REFERENCES IN PLANS.—A State or Tribal plan referred to in paragraph (1) may include a reference to a law of the State or Indian tribe regulating the production of hemp, to the extent that law is consistent with this subtitle.

“(b) Approval.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 60 days after receipt of a State or Tribal plan under subsection (a), the Secretary shall—

“(A) approve the State or Tribal plan if the State or Tribal plan complies with subsection (a); or

“(B) disapprove the State or Tribal plan only if the State or Tribal plan does not comply with subsection (a).

“(2) AMENDED PLANS.—If the Secretary disapproves a State or Tribal plan under paragraph (1)(B), the State, through the State department of agriculture (in consultation with the Governor and chief law enforcement officer of the State) or the Tribal government, as applicable, may submit to the Secretary an amended State or Tribal plan that complies with subsection (a).

“(c) Technical Assistance.—The Secretary may provide technical assistance to a State or Indian tribe in the development of a State or Tribal plan under subsection (a).

“(d) Violations.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—A violation of a State or Tribal plan approved under subsection (b) shall be subject to enforcement solely in accordance with this subsection.

“(2) NEGLIGENT VIOLATIONS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—A hemp producer in a State or the territory of an Indian tribe for which a State or Tribal plan is approved under subsection (b) shall be subject to subparagraph (B) of this paragraph if the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable, determines that the hemp producer has negligently violated the State or Tribal plan, including by negligently—

“(i) failing to provide a legal description of land on which the producer produces hemp;

“(ii) failing to obtain a license or other required authorization from the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable; or

“(iii) producing Cannabis sativa L. with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.

“(B) CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN.—A hemp producer described in subparagraph (A) shall comply with a plan established by the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable, to correct the negligent violation, including—

“(i) a reasonable date by which the hemp producer shall correct the negligent violation; and

“(ii) a requirement that the hemp producer shall periodically report to the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable, on the compliance of the hemp producer with the State or Tribal plan for a period of not less than the next 2 calendar years.

“(C) RESULT OF NEGLIGENT VIOLATION.—Except as provided in subparagraph (D), a hemp producer that negligently violates a State or Tribal plan under subparagraph (A) shall not be subject to any criminal or civil enforcement action by the Federal Government or any State government, Tribal government, or local government other than the enforcement action authorized under subparagraph (B).

“(D) REPEAT VIOLATIONS.—A hemp producer that negligently violates a State or Tribal plan under subparagraph (A) 3 times in a 5-year period shall be ineligible to produce hemp for a period of 5 years beginning on the date of the third violation.

“(3) OTHER VIOLATIONS.—If the State department of agriculture or Tribal government in a State or the territory of an Indian tribe for which a State or Tribal plan is approved under subsection (b), as applicable, determines that a hemp producer in the State or territory has violated the State or Tribal plan with a culpable mental state greater than negligence—

“(A) the State department of agriculture or Tribal government, as applicable, shall immediately report the hemp producer to—

“(i) the Attorney General; and

“(ii) in the case of a State department of agriculture, the chief law enforcement officer of the State; and

“(B) paragraph (1) of this subsection shall not apply to the violation.

“(e) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as are necessary to carry out this section.

“(f) Effect.—Nothing in this section prohibits the production of hemp in a State or the territory of an Indian tribe for which a State or Tribal plan is not approved under this section in accordance with other Federal laws (including regulations).

“SEC. 297C. AUTHORITY TO ISSUE REGULATIONS AND GUIDELINES.

“The Secretary shall have sole authority to issue Federal regulations and guidelines that relate to the production of hemp, including Federal regulations and guidelines that relate to the implementation of section 297B.”.
SEC. 3. FUNDING FOR HEMP RESEARCH.
(a) Supplemental And Alternative Crops.—Section 1473D(c)(3)(E) of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (7 U.S.C. 3319d(c)(3)(E)) is amended by inserting “(including hemp (as defined in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946))” after “material”.

(b) Critical Agricultural Materials.—Section 5(b)(9) of the Critical Agricultural Materials Act (7 U.S.C. 178c(b)(9)) is amended by inserting “, and including hemp (as defined in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946)” after “hydrocarbon-containing plants”.

SEC. 4. LEGITIMACY OF INDUSTRIAL HEMP RESEARCH.
(a) In General.—Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (7 U.S.C. 5940) is amended—

(1) by redesignating subsections (a) and (b) as subsections (b) and (a), respectively, and moving the subsections so as to appear in alphabetical order;

(2) in subsection (b) (as so redesignated), in the subsection heading, by striking “In General” and inserting “Industrial Hemp Research”; and

(3) by adding at the end the following:

 

“(c) Study And Report.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall conduct a study of agricultural pilot programs—

“(A) to determine the economic viability of the domestic production and sale of industrial hemp; and

“(B) that shall include a review of—

“(i) each agricultural pilot program; and

“(ii) any other agricultural or academic research relating to industrial hemp.

“(2) REPORT.—Not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report describing the results of the study conducted under paragraph (1).”.

(b) Repeal.—Effective on the date that is 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (7 U.S.C. 5940) is repealed.

SEC. 5. FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE.
(a) Definition Of Hemp.—Section 502(b) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1502(b)) is amended—

(1) by redesignating paragraphs (8) through (11) as paragraphs (9) through (12), respectively; and

(2) by inserting after paragraph (7) the following:

 

“(8) HEMP.—The term ‘hemp’ has the meaning given the term in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946.”.

(b) Insurance Period.—Section 508(a)(2) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1508(a)(2)) is amended by striking “and sweet potatoes” and inserting “sweet potatoes, and hemp”.

(c) Submission Of Policies And Materials To Board.—Section 508(h) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1508(h)) is amended—

(1) in paragraph (1)(B)—

(A) by redesignating clauses (i) through (iii) as subclauses (I) through (III), respectively, and indenting appropriately;

(B) in the matter preceding subclause (I) (as so redesignated), by striking “The Corporation shall” and inserting the following:

 

“(i) IN GENERAL.—The Corporation shall”;

(C) in clause (i)(I) (as so redesignated), by inserting “subject to clause (ii),” before “will likely”; and

(D) by adding at the end the following:

 

“(ii) WAIVER FOR HEMP.—The Corporation may waive the viability and marketability requirement under clause (i)(I) in the case of a policy or pilot program relating to the production of hemp.”; and

(2) in paragraph (3)(C)—

(A) in clause (ii), by striking “and” at the end;

(B) in clause (iii), by striking the period at the end and inserting “; and”; and

(C) by adding at the end the following:

 

“(iv) in the case of reviewing policies and other materials relating to the production of hemp, may waive the viability and marketability requirement under subparagraph (A)(ii)(I).”.

(d) Agricultural Commodity.—Section 518 of the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1518) is amended by inserting “hemp,” before “aquacultural species”.

(e) Research And Development Authority.—Section 522(b) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1522(b)) is amended—

(1) in paragraph (2), by adding at the end the following:

 

“(K) WAIVER FOR HEMP.—The Board may waive the viability and marketability requirements under this paragraph in the case of research and development relating to a policy to ensure the production of hemp.”; and

(2) in paragraph (3)—

(A) by striking “The Corporation” and inserting the following:

 

“(A) IN GENERAL.—Subject to subparagraph (B), the Corporation”; and

(B) by adding at the end the following:

 

“(B) WAIVER FOR HEMP.—The Corporation may waive the marketability requirement under subparagraph (A) in the case of research and development relating to a policy to ensure the production of hemp.”.

SEC. 6. CONFORMING CHANGES TO CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT.
(a) In General.—Section 102(16) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802(16)) is amended—

(1) by striking “(16) The” and inserting “(16)(A) Subject to subparagraph (B), the”; and

(2) by striking “Such term does not include the” and inserting the following:

 

“(B) The term ‘marihuana’ does not include—

“(i) hemp, as defined in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946; or

“(ii) the”.

(b) Tetrahydrocannabinol.—Schedule I, as set forth in section 202(c) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812(c)), is amended in subsection (c)(17) by inserting after “Tetrahydrocannabinols” the following: “, except for tetrahydrocannabinols in hemp (as defined under section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946)”.

SEC. 7. RULE OF CONSTRUCTION.

Nothing in this Act authorizes interference with the interstate commerce of hemp (as defined in section 297A of the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, as added by section 2).

DOWNLOAD THE WHOLE DOCUMENT BELOW

Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 

“You will find the language about Hemp starting on page 803 and ending on page 812. Please feel free to download and share.

States And Hemp

Federal actions taken

President Obama signed the Agricultural Act of 2014, or the 2014 Farm Bill, which included Section 7606 allowing for universities and state departments of agriculture to begin cultivating industrial hemp for limited purposes. Specifically, the law allows universities and state departments of agriculture to grow or cultivate industrial hemp if:

“(1) the industrial hemp is grown or cultivated for purposes of research conducted under an agricultural pilot program or other agricultural or academic research; and

(2) the growing or cultivating of industrial hemp is allowed under the laws of the state in which such institution of higher education or state department of agriculture is located and such research occurs.”

The law also requires that the hemp grow sites be certified by—and registered with—their state.

Click Here to learn where your State stands on Hemp.